February 6, 2010

I watched Food, Inc. and I think I'm gonna puke, inc.



Forget Halloween, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, or anything with Jennifer Aniston --- this is one scary movie.

Food Inc. is the true horror film of where our food comes from, and the villains are big business, big government, and corn.

When I walk through the supermarket I don't really think about where the food comes from. Food, Inc. is about the source of our food, and folks, I gotta tell you... eww... it ain't pretty. The film talks about the big business of food, about the what's behind the 47,000 products in the average American supermarket. It's big oil, or Wall Street. With livestock.

The food we eat is totally different than what our grandparents ate, even when it looks the same. Because the big companies want it to look the same. But truth is, as you hold that shrink-wrapped boneless skinless plumped up chicken breast in your hands, if you were to follow the food chain back to origin, it goes to a factory not a farm, and to a chicken hopped up on antibiotics so it grows twice the size in half the time, a chicken that never sees sunlight, a chicken that lives a short brutal life, because we want everything faster and cheaper.

Yep, totally gross. And I eat chicken regularly. Not so happy about that now.

Who's to blame? Well I blame Glenn Beck. Okay, not really. Our fast food culture is to blame, specifically the Walmartization of our culture, where we want everything bigger, faster, cheaper, where a small number of very big companies influence how things are made and how government policy is written.

Why is the government to blame? Due to government subsidies on corn, wheat, and soy, that make them so profitable, junk food is cheaper than real food.

Why is big business to blame? A few number of companies control the whole food system from seed to supermarket, and make billions. These big companies do not want farmers talking, do not want this story told - there is a food world deliberately hidden from us, and it is no Candyland. As told in the most disturbing part of Food, Inc., where we see the chickens as mass merchandise and not live beings, in the 1930s fast food changed the world of food when McDonald's brought the factory system to back of the restaurant, when the kitchen became a production line of uniformity and cheapness.

When McDonald's is the largest purchaser of beef and potatoes in the US and one of the biggest purchasers of chicken, pork, and tomatoes, they determine how food is made. Even if you don't eat at McDonald's, you are eating food made to their specifications: chickens raised in 48 days rather than 70, twice the size, fattened up with gallons of antibiotics so have more white meat, all to produce more, faster, cheaper. The birds are a production line, they never see sunlight, they all need to be the same size --- all to produce a lot of food on a smaller piece of land at an affordable price.

Our food supply is scary stuff, and this film is scary stuff. It presents the food industry as cutthroat and sadistic, and backs up its claims with facts.

Distressful as the movie is, it's not really depressing --- okay, okay, it is a little, and you're gonna put down the chocolate-dipped triple stuff Oreo as you watch. Food, Inc. does a great job as it also looks forward and tells what we each can do eat better (eat organic, eat local, eat unprocessed).

Rent it. Watch it while you enjoy a large milkshake, party-size Chicken McNuggets, and supersized fries...

23 comments:

Kevin said...

Eat organically grown and produced foods. Grow your own fruits and vegetables, wherever possible. Reduce the amount of packaging on the items you buy. Reuse whatever possible. Recycle everything else. Compost waste. It all impacts the way food and merchandise is produced. It is our world, and as far as I know, it is the only one we have. Make informed choices.

Kelly@TearingUpHouses said...

My best friend called me 2 nights ago to tell me to rent this movie! I'm all about being educated, so I'm heading to Blockbuster tonight...

Kelly

TICKLEBEAR said...

ignorance is bliss, unless you're ready to change things. good luck with that!!
:)~

Jason said...

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll be watching this movie. In the meantime, I'm sharing this post on FB.

injaynesworld said...

Yeah... I think I'll just take your word for it. It's not that I don't want to know. I do know. I just can't watch it. I do applaud the makers of this film, though, and you for writing about it.

falltoclimb said...

Once again I find myself very thankful to be living in a teeny-tiny rural agricultural community, where I can buy meat from my little local butcher, and know that my produce is coming from small, local farms where none of this scary crap is going on and the farmers think it's as gross as I do.

wanderingthroughwonderland said...

Blech... the movie made my stomach turn. The documentary rang very true although there was a bit of fear mongering that ran through it. Regardless, it was enough to make this die-hard carnivore find a butcher that sells ethically produced meat.

Aunt Juicebox said...

This is in my Netflix queue, and to be honest, now I'm not sure I want to watch it. I know there are some gross things about the food supply (I watched a show on how pickles are made and a guy was walking on top of them...with his SHOES on, ugh) but it's not like I can stop eating, or move to a farm and grow my own stuff, so maybe I'd rather just be ignorant....

Anissa said...

I'm afraid to watch it. Not because I eat most of these things, but because I'm so easily grossed out! I stopped eating meat last year and pretty much go organic on all our produce and dairy. I figure I'm probably doing OK.

massi said...

I believe this movie, or otehr similar I sew in the past, are so usefull. Someone must let us open our eyes on how far we are from the nature and the real agricolture.
lokk for farmer market, try to eat as simpler you can. You improve farmer condition and your health too.
and leave alone Mc or other "restaurant" with their junkee food.

GregoryJ said...

I didn't read this post. Ignorance is bliss.
Thanks for the comment on my blog. NC-17. Others have gone to the site and got ridiculous ratings as well. I don't know what kind of criteria they use, but it's a joke, whether they mean it to be or not.
I love Alfred. My wife and I had a similar looking dog many years ago that we got from an animal shelter. I posted a pic on the S&F Blog Club when I saw your avatar there.
thanks again,
Greg

GregoryJ said...

Brahm, can you do me a favor and go to this post and tell me whether or not you get the soap reference?
The Office Scribe thinks it's obvious, at least to anyone knowing pop culture. I could not get it even with hints. I don't know pop culture. So she made fun of men. Well, maybe not, but she did tell me off. sort of.
I'm not looking to be malicious with her if you prove her wrong. I won't even rub it in. too much.
Thanks,
Greg

Tracie said...

I've heard of this movie before and part of me would really like to see it. But the part of me that thinks Ignorance Is Bliss says "No thanks" and heads to the drive thru.

TICKLEBEAR said...

you've been nominated for the KREATIV BLOGGER AWARD.
:)~
HUGZ

http://defyingthestereotypes.blogspot.com/2010/02/kreativ-blogger-award-2010.html

Brahm said...

Hey Gregory -- nope, I did not get soap reference, and I like to think I am a pop culutre guru (aka obsessed freak)... so go ahead and rub it in (ooh, that sounds dirty)...!

Stan in NH said...

It is scary how we produce our food. I'll definitely want to check this movie out. I don't know if our "human consumption standards" were covered in this movie, but if you want a double "treat", check out the "standards" for processing and packaging of food for human consumption sometime. I believe they are available online in total, but here's a preview you might enjoy!
http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/05/06/29/how_many_insect_parts_and_rodent_hairs_are_allowed_in_your_food.htm.

Just how many fly wings are in my peanut butter?

bmat10 said...

I stopped eating chicken for about 7yrs because of the chicken industry. But one day I was at Chalet Swiss in Montreal and I broke down, it was just so good. Now I eat it quite a bit,I certainly won't eat those free range chickens, heck they have the most to live for. I still won't eat veal. Everything else is fair game.

Anonymous said...

thankfully, it's a little bit better in europe. in spain, i know that if i buy seasonal produce in my father's village, it's usually off someone's trees or plants almost within walking distance. all fish products are clearly identified as to origin (geography and farm/wild), and the best option with meat is to buy the expensive, as it's usually free range...
diego

J@v@JuNKo said...

I no hasz cheeseburgerz?? I totally need to watch this even though i know its not going to be easy to digest but a good wake up call if anything!!

krista said...

I streamed this from netfix the other day. I may never eat again. At least until I buy my own farm and start raising my own livestock. I have started to try to change the way my family eats so that we eat less meat, and what meat we do eat is organic. Those chickens really freaked me out. Maybe someday I'll even be able to stomach paying $5.60 for a gallon of organic milk.

Daffodil Campbell said...

That movie was intense. When I say that Costco sells things made out of corn and plastic, I am not kidding.....almost every item involves one of those two things. And if I never see the inside of a digesting cow ever again, it will be too soon. ((((shudder)))

marymac said...

My daughter is vegan so I have been put through this and other movies, and yeah, it makes you want to curl up in a ball and eat grass or something- which we couldn't, because it has acid rain all over it. Basically, we're fucked, so we might as well eat the partially hydrogenated Oreos while we're waiting to die. Yes?

inannasstar said...

ok, first of all I love your blog and am so happy I found it. Second of all, my bfff has been pimping this movie for months now since she saw it and ***hanging my head in shame*** I have yet to see it. Honestly, I know it is going to affect my life in a major way so I'm waiting for the right time to watch it i.e. when I hit the lottery so I can buy grass fed beef (apparently that's a big part of the movie?) at WholePaycheck (aka WholeFoods).

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